Deep Within Earth Are Buried Fragments Of An Old Ancient Planet

Vast Fragments of an Alien World Could Be Buried Deep Within Earth Itself

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Smoke rises from Kilauea volcano on May 6, 2018. (Photo by Handout / USGS/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)

Scientists may have solved the mystery of the massive structures surrounding the Earth’s core. The answer? They are the remains of an ancient world from our solar system that collided with our planet billions of years ago.

According to a theory about the formation of the moon, an ancient world called Theia is believed to have crashed into Earth 4.5 billion years ago.

According to research results, it was about the size of Mars, but had a much higher density than the Earth.

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Artist’s impression of a planetary collision. (NASA/JPL-Caltech)

According to a theory about the formation of the moon, an ancient world called Theia is said to have crashed to Earth 4.5 billion years ago.

According to research, it was about the size of Mars, but had a much higher density than the Earth.

In fact, this is one of the theories, but it is highly supported by the scientific community. Many similar studies have been carried out in the last decades, which in time will allow the scientific community to develop a unified position on this issue. At the same time, the mysterious protoplanet Theia raises the most questions.

Massive structures from ancient alien world surround Earth’s core

Scientists believe they have found evidence of the ancient collision between Earth and the ancient alien planet. This time, the search led to the center of the Earth, where two mysterious structures surround the Earth’s core in the lower layers of the mantle, one of which lies under Africa and the other under the Pacific Ocean.

These formations look like giant drops and raise many questions. They are also denser than the rest of the mantle.

Here are the two “bubbles” that may have come from an ancient alien world that collided with Earth. Credit: Jamie Ward

These dense “bubbles” are the largest structures in the Earth’s mantle, occupying up to six percent of the planet’s total volume. The scientists named them Large Low-Shear Velocity Provinces (LLSVP).

The scientists behind the study considered the version of the grandiose collision that nearly destroyed the planet 4.5 billion years ago, but eventually led to the formation of the moon.

This hypothesis was considered by geologists from the University of Arizona, who presented it at the 52nd Lunar and Planetary Conference, held online. Indeed, evidence suggests that bubbles were formed at least immediately after the collision.

These dense “bubbles” are the largest structures in the Earth’s mantle, occupying up to six percent of the planet’s total volume. The scientists named them Large Low-Shear Velocity Provinces (LLSVP).

The scientists behind the study considered the version of the grandiose collision that nearly destroyed the planet 4.5 billion years ago, but eventually led to the formation of the moon.

This hypothesis was considered by geologists from the University of Arizona, who presented it at the 52nd Lunar and Planetary Conference, held online. Indeed, evidence suggests that bubbles were formed at least immediately after the collision.

LLSVPs occupy a significant portion of the Earth’s mantle and the entire planet. Credit: Sanne Cottaar

Evidence

The ancient alien world that collided with Earth – Theia – is believed to have been about three times the size of Earth, roughly the size of Mars today. However, geologist Steven Desch of the University of Arizona believes that Theia was much larger. The fact is that some of its material went into the composition of the moon.

Analysis of lunar samples shows that the ratio of hydrogen isotopes – protium to deuterium – is higher in them than on Earth. To maintain the excess of the lightest atoms, Desch says, Theia must be a massive and dense body.

Model calculations by geologists showed that the planet’s core merged with Earth’s as a result of the impact, and that individual clumps of Theia’s dense mantle (1.5 to 3.5 percent denser than Earth’s) could remain on the outer surface of the resulting core.

Thus, the LLSVPs could hide most of the lost planet: according to scientists, the total mass of the “bubbles” is six times the mass of the Moon. However, this model remains only an early hypothesis, a speculation, and must be further developed and refined before we find out the true picture.

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